Monday, June 19, 2017

flotsam and jetsam...and covfefe

One of the inevitable byproducts of my peculiar way of being on social media is that I end up with all sorts of multimedia fragments produced in response to this or that. Many of them find their way here to the blog (such as this Bach Suite Boys bit now featured on Classic FM), but some don't seem quite postworthy - unless, I introduce them this way in a post about the unpostworthy!

A couple of weeks back, when the Trump covfefe tweet was having its fifteen seconds, I kept seeing musicians link to a little "covfefe" aria that ends with the famous Rite of Spring chord - which was fine and cute. But, I couldn't help speculating that the ambiguity of Trump's neologism deserved a similarly ambiguous musical context, so I speculated that Wagner's Tristan chord would be more appropriate.

Even though the story had long since blown over, I couldn't help myself, and decided I'd transition from the much more conventional and comic Rossini - specifically, the opening of Almaviva's aria "Ecco ridente in cielo." One could make a case that this tenor aria is much too elegant and lyrical for this character, but I couldn't come up with a good transition from Figaro or Don Basilio, buffo characters more in the spirit of Don Trump. And I think the raspy synth voice makes up for it. Plus, the one bar of Rossini I quote is quite pedestrian, so it's more like Don Trump begins by trying to be profound and quickly finds himself completely lost.

Anyway, what we have here is a two-bar micro-composition. It's fragmentary for sure, though I think it can also stand on its own as a Tweetstück. (A German piano piece is often titled "Klavierstück.")



There's not really an original note here as all I've done is segue from one work to another, though I still think I deserve a finder's fee for showing how nicely this transition works. A quick history of 19th century opera in two bars. Short as it is, a Trump opera should have at least one tweet aria, so I've included it in my quirky Il trumpatore playlist.

And since I promised both flotsam and jetsam, here is something even briefer, which is nothing like a complete composition. Just a little proof of concept. In a Facebook discussion that had sprouted off from my Bach Suite Boys example, it occurred to me that one of the discussants is a big non-fan of The Who and Samuel Barber's Violin Concerto. So, just for T.B., I proposed a "Barber O'Riley" mashup that would combine Baba O'Riley and...well, you know. Because it's easy to do, because it's fun to do, and as basic proof of concept, I offered up only four bars, and here they are:




If there's anything valuable about this kind of exercise, it's showing how easily gestures from very different genres can cross over and work together. Sometimes ten seconds of audio are worth a thousand words - or at least a few dozen.

Sunday, June 11, 2017

Punspiration (or Puns as Portals)

Anyone who's been here before would know that I love mashups and wordplay, and if you've read closely enough, you'd know that I think of these two sports as two sides of a many-sided coin, connected by the idea of connection. (Counterpoint is another side of that coin.) For whatever reason, I've found myself creating two little mashups in the past week which were inspired by puns; you could even say these mashups have no reason to exist apart from the coincidence of some silly wordplay. Keep reading if you dare.

Just a couple of days ago, a Facebook friend wrote something about how young people in his children's choir don't know/respect the classics...specifically, the music of "The Backstreet Boys." The truth is, I only know one one song (only because of this) from this boy band's canon, but I nonetheless ended up making a silly joke about "knowing all the canons in the Bach Suite Boys' canon." Before long, I was thinking of which Bach suite might best host "I want it that way," and after I'd settled on the Allemande from the D Minor French Suite....



...the rest took shape pretty fast. (I believe that in square dancing, participants are sometimes asked to allemande this way and that, so I ran with this idea and imagined a caller just telling his dancers to allemande...that way.)



Only a few days before on the very same Facebook, I had written something about Pachelbel's Canon in D and weddings. A friend mentioned she'd heard once of a couple who requested the "Indie Canon" for their ceremony. It didn't take long for me to think of re-imagining Indie as Indy, and voilà, another bit of punned counterpoint:



So, I believe both of these little "pieces" are musically satisfying, but they would honestly be less so if they didn't have that silly pun logic holding them together. It's as if the pun becomes a portal through which we find two somethings are more connected in a way we'd never otherwise have imagined.

I have, of course, done this kind of thing before, most notably with varied ways of combining Stravinsky's "Rite of Spring" with other springtime selections. (I guess these are barely puns since the word "spring" basically means the same thing in each context.) Anyway:

Stravinsky + Copland



Stravinsky + Vivaldi



Stravinsky + Beethoven



But that's not all! There's this play on the fact that pianists often refer to Rachmaninoff as "Rachy."



And finally, two realizations of a world in which Luigi Boccherini meets Mario's brother Luigi:




(Yes, I realize Luigi -> Luigi is also not a pure pun.)


If you just can't get enough, here's an MMmusing Musical Pun Playlist, with a few bonus tracks.